A glass of wine for one night is good for the elderly – but not for anyone else

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Wine becomes better (for you) with age: one glass per night is good for the elderly – but not for anyone else

  • Alcohol consumption was found to offset the effects of some age-related diseases, including coronary artery disease, diabetes and dementia
  • The researchers found that 60% of the potentially lost life years were in the age range between 20 and 49 years, while about 15% of the lost years were in those over 65 years
  • In addition, 80% of alcohol-prevented deaths were among the elderly

Mary Kekatos Health Reporter for Dailymail.com

A glass of wine a day can be good for you – if you are over 50, find a new study.

The researchers found a breath here and there did miracles to compensate for age-related diseases that emerge in middle age – including coronary heart disease, dementia, diabetes, stroke and osteoporosis.

In fact, alcohol prevents about 1,500 deaths in the year – and the Boston Medical Center team in Massachusetts found that 80% of those are among adults aged 65 and over.

This is despite the way we are told to avoid alcohol because of its harmful effects, including the cause of breast cancer, pancreatitis and liver disease.

A new study by the Boston Medical Center found that 60% of the years of potential loss of life occurred between 20 and 49 years, while about 15% of the years lost occurred in those over 65 (image of the file)

A new study by the Boston Medical Center found that 60% of the years of potential loss of life occurred between 20 and 49 years, while about 15% of the years lost occurred in those over 65 (image of the file)

A new study by the Boston Medical Center found that 60% of the years of potential loss of life occurred between 20 and 49 years, while about 15% of the years lost occurred in those over 65 (image of the file)

"Up until about 10 years ago, there was this belief that alcohol was good for you," said Dr. Naimi at DailyMail.com.

"It's not that alcohol can not be enjoyed, it's one thing to say and another thing is to say it's good for your health."

He went on to explain that people in the United States started drinking before the age of twenty, but many drinking studies do not enroll people until they are about 50 years old.

The main problem with this is that 40 percent of alcohol-related deaths occur before the age of 50.

This is from a number of problems including gastritis, breast cancer, liver cancer, hypertension and prostate cancer.

"This shows that people who live up to age 50 and drink at the moment are" survivors "- if you want – of their drinking," said Dr. Naimi.

"They could be healthier or have safer eating habits, they are not an appropriate group to compare with non-drinkers."

For the current study, the team looked at impact demand data on alcohol-related illnesses.

Managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the database estimates the deaths and years of potential alcohol-related loss of life between 2006 and 2010 in the United States.

The researchers found that when it came to alcohol-related deaths – from conditions such as liver disease, heart attack and pancreatitis – age played an important role.

Almost 36 percent of alcohol-related deaths were among people aged 20 to 49.

But in the deaths that were avoided by consuming alcohol in this age group, it was only 4.5%.

When it came to people aged 65 or over, a similar 35% of deaths were caused by alcohol.

But there was a huge spike in deaths prevented by alcohol among the elderly at 80%.

The dott. Naimi said this is due to the beneficial effects that alcohol can have – particularly for cardiovascular disease and cholelithiasis, also known as gallstones.

Previous studies have shown that drinking small amounts of alcohol reduces the amount of cholesterol in the bile, thus reducing the risk of developing gallstones.

For years of life lost, about 60 percent – the largest number – was between 20 and 49 years.

In people aged over 65, about 15% of the years have been lost.

The dott. Naimi said the results show that young people "are more likely to die from alcohol consumption than to die from lack of drinking".

However, older people are more likely to see the health benefits of moderate drinking.

According to the Mayo Clinic, moderately drinking means no more than one drink a day for women and men over 65.

It consists of 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of distillates.

Performance may include a reduction in heart risk and possibly a reduction in the risk of stroke and diabetes.

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