Home Tech A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

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Emma Haruka Iwao.Emma Haruka Iwao made history.Google

Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao broke the world record in calculating the number of Pi pips using Google cloud computing, the infinite number of great importance for engineers.

Most people know at least the first decimals from geometry lessons: 3.14. Pi is calculated by dividing the circumference of the circle by the diameter of the circle.

The Google employee calculated 31 trillion decimals of Pi

Iwao – a cloud computing developer who has worked for Google for more than three years – has successfully calculated 31 trillion decimal places for Pi, surpassing the old record of 9,000 billion. Google released its success Thursday – and the day Pi (March 14 or in spelling USA 3/14).

Also read: 20 years of Google: these images show how the search engine has changed over the years

The calculation required the processing of large amounts of data. Using the Y-Cruncher program, he used Google's cloud clusters to anticipate 170 terabytes of data over four months. For comparison, the BBC claims that around 200,000 music titles arrive on a single terabyte data volume.

Here you can see Iwao's explanation, as he calculated Pi:

You can also read the technical explanation from Google here.

Google employee: "Want to determine even more decimal places"

Iwao says it was the first time that cloud computing was used to calculate Pi and break the record. A Yahoo engineer used the group's cloud technology in 2010 to calculate the sum of two trillion years of Pi, but did not specify all the decimal numbers in the middle.

Iwao told the BBC that he still wants to work with the county. "Pi is infinite – I would like to determine even more decimal places".

Translated article


A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao has …

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

Google, cloud computing, science, browser

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

2019-03-14T19: 50: 45 + 01: 00

2019-03-14T19: 00: 36 + 01: 00

2019-03-14T19: 57: 44 + 01: 00

https://static2.businessinsider.de/image/5c8aa257a57a983bae18ab73-500-250/eine-google-angestellte-hat-gerade-den-weltrekord-im-pi-rechnen-geknackt.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao broke the world record in calculating the number of Pi pips using Google cloud computing, the infinite number of great importance for engineers.
Most people know at least the first decimals from geometry lessons: 3.14. Pi is calculated by dividing the circumference of the circle by the diameter of the circle.
The Google employee calculated 31 trillion decimals of Pi
Iwao – a cloud computing developer who has worked for Google for more than three years – has successfully calculated 31 trillion decimal places for Pi, surpassing the old record of 9,000 billion. Google released its success Thursday – and the day Pi (March 14 or in spelling USA 3/14).
Also read: 20 years of Google: these images show how the search engine has changed over the years
The calculation required the processing of large amounts of data. Using the Y-Cruncher program, he used Google's cloud clusters to anticipate 170 terabytes of data over four months. For comparison, the BBC claims that around 200,000 music titles arrive on a single terabyte data volume.
Here you can see Iwao's explanation, as he calculated Pi:
Youtube Embed: //www.youtube.com/embed/JvEvTcXF-4Q Width: 1280px Height: 720px
You can also read the technical explanation from Google here.
Google employee: "Want to determine even more decimal places"
Iwao says it was the first time that cloud computing was used to calculate Pi and break the record. A Yahoo engineer used the group's cloud technology in 2010 to calculate the sum of two trillion years of Pi, but did not specify all the decimal numbers in the middle.
Iwao told the BBC that he still wants to work with the county. "Pi is infinite – I would like to determine even more decimal places".
Translated article

science

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao has …

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

Google, cloud computing, science, browser

A Google employee has just broken the pi-arithmetic world record

2019-03-14T19: 50: 45 + 01: 00

2019-03-14T19: 57: 44 + 01: 00

https://static2.businessinsider.de/image/5c8aa257a57a983bae18ab73-500-250/eine-google-angestellte-hat-gerade-den-weltrekord-im-pi-rechnen-geknackt.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao broke the world record in calculating the number of Pi pips using Google cloud computing, the infinite number of great importance for engineers.
Most people know at least the first decimals from geometry lessons: 3.14. Pi is calculated by dividing the circumference of the circle by the diameter of the circle.
The Google employee calculated 31 trillion decimals of Pi
Iwao – a cloud computing developer who has worked for Google for more than three years – has successfully calculated 31 trillion decimal places for Pi, surpassing the old record of 9,000 billion. Google released its success Thursday – and the day Pi (March 14 or in spelling USA 3/14).
Also read: 20 years of Google: these images show how the search engine has changed over the years
The calculation required the processing of large amounts of data. Using the Y-Cruncher program, he used Google's cloud clusters to anticipate 170 terabytes of data over four months. For comparison, the BBC claims that around 200,000 music titles arrive on a single terabyte data volume.
Here you can see Iwao's explanation, as he calculated Pi:
Youtube Embed: //www.youtube.com/embed/JvEvTcXF-4Q Width: 1280px Height: 720px
You can also read the technical explanation from Google here.
Google employee: "Want to determine even more decimal places"
Iwao says it was the first time that cloud computing was used to calculate Pi and break the record. A Yahoo engineer used the group's cloud technology in 2010 to calculate the sum of two trillion years of Pi, but did not specify all the decimal numbers in the middle.
Iwao told the BBC that he still wants to work with the county. "Pi is infinite – I would like to determine even more decimal places".
Translated article

science

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