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And American scientists announced, in a study by the University of “Rutgers” published by the magazine “Advanced Science”, that the rise in sea levels is the result of human activities and not differences in the orbit of the planet.

They pointed out that there is a link between modern sea level rise and human activities, although Earth’s changing orbit has played a major role in climate change millions of years ago.

Scientists, however, agree by an overwhelming majority that climate change is driven by global warming resulting from what humans do and the release of greenhouse gases.

Climate scientists at the University of “Rutgers” found that the Earth passed through almost ice-free periods, with carbon dioxide levels not much higher than they are today.

Scientists have also discovered ice periods during the past 66 million years, within times previously thought to be ice-free, according to the British newspaper “Daily Express”.

“Our team showed that the history of ice on Earth was more complex than previously thought. Although carbon dioxide levels had a significant impact on ice-free periods, minor differences in Earth’s orbit were a dominant factor,” lead author Kenneth J. Miller said. , In terms of ice volume and sea level changes until modern times. “

The collective effects of changes in Earth’s orbit are known as “Milankovic cycles,” which are named after the Serbian scientist Milutin Milankovic.

According to NASA, cycles can affect the Earth’s climate over “very long periods of time, ranging from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of years.”

But sea level rise has accelerated in recent decades, and scientists believe the impact of human activities on climate is the cause.

Modern climate change is attributed to the mass release of greenhouse gases, which the Industrial Revolution began in the nineteenth century.

And the modern American study reconstructed the history of sea levels and freezing, since the end of the dinosaur age about 66 million years ago, and also found that in a world free of ice, sea levels could rise by 66 meters.

Scientists have estimated the average global sea level based on geochemical records in the deep sea.

The study found that periods of ice-free conditions roughly 17 and 13 million years ago occurred when levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were slightly higher than they are today.

Carbon dioxide is one of the critical greenhouse gases that drive climate change, however, the study also found that ice periods occurred when the planet was believed to be free of ice from 48 to 34 million years ago.

In their study, scientists wrote: “Sea level change is one of the most visible manifestations of climate change, both in the past as the Earth evolved from green, ice-free worlds (such as the Late Cretaceous) to largely icy worlds.”

Sea level rise threatens to permanently flood lowlands and infrastructure by 2100.

“>

And American scientists announced, in a study by the University of “Rutgers” published by the magazine “Advanced Science”, that the rise in sea levels is the result of human activities and not differences in the orbit of the planet.

They pointed out that there is a link between modern sea level rise and human activities, although Earth’s changing orbit has played a major role in climate change millions of years ago.

Scientists, however, agree by an overwhelming majority that climate change is driven by global warming resulting from what humans do and the release of greenhouse gases.

Climate scientists at the University of “Rutgers” found that the Earth passed through almost ice-free periods, with carbon dioxide levels not much higher than they are today.

Scientists have also discovered ice periods during the past 66 million years, within times previously thought to be ice-free, according to the British newspaper “Daily Express”.

“Our team showed that the history of ice on Earth was more complex than previously thought. Although carbon dioxide levels had a significant impact on ice-free periods, minor differences in Earth’s orbit were a dominant factor,” lead author Kenneth J. Miller said. , In terms of ice volume and sea level changes until modern times. “

The collective effects of changes in Earth’s orbit are known as “Milankovic cycles,” which are named after the Serbian scientist Milutin Milankovic.

According to NASA, cycles can affect the Earth’s climate over “very long periods of time, ranging from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of years.”

But sea level rise has accelerated in recent decades, and scientists believe the impact of human activities on climate is the cause.

Modern climate change is attributed to the mass release of greenhouse gases, which the Industrial Revolution began in the nineteenth century.

And the modern American study reconstructed the history of sea levels and freezing, since the end of the dinosaur age about 66 million years ago, and also found that in a world free of ice, sea levels could rise by 66 meters.

Scientists have estimated the average global sea level based on geochemical records in the deep sea.

The study found that periods of ice-free conditions roughly 17 and 13 million years ago occurred when levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were slightly higher than they are today.

Carbon dioxide is one of the critical greenhouse gases that drive climate change, however, the study also found that ice periods occurred when the planet was believed to be free of ice from 48 to 34 million years ago.

In their study, scientists wrote: “Sea level change is one of the most visible manifestations of climate change, both in the past as the Earth evolved from green, ice-free worlds (such as the Late Cretaceous) to largely icy worlds.”

Sea level rise threatens to permanently flood lowlands and infrastructure by 2100.

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