At least 25 dead as forest fires hit California in the north and south

MILLE OAKS, Calif. – The death toll from the fires on both sides of California rose to at least 25 on Saturday, while property damage from fires continued to rise, including the destruction of a famous West Hollywood set.

In Northern California, the 100,000-acre Fire Camp, which began on Thursday, continued to threaten a number of communities including the city of Oroville after killing at least 23 people and destroying over 6,400 homes and 260 businesses.

Saturday evening, Butte County Sheriff said investigators recovered 14 additional bodies, three days after the fire, reported the Associated Press.

Earlier, Butte County Sheriff's Office officials reported that five bodies had been found in vehicles in an area of ​​paradise. Deputy Chief Scott McLean of the California Forestry and Fire Department said people died trying to escape the fire. The sheriff's officials said four more victims were found, including one in a burned-out residence and the other three in all the outer homes. With the increase of two dozen still missing in the Camp Fire area, the death toll could rise further. The authorities have warned that many of the missing may be out of touch and present themselves later.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Saturday confirmed the death of two people in Woolsey Fire, which exploded to over 70,000 acres after starting Thursday in an exasperating canyon in Ventura County. The fire went to the Pacific Ocean and caused mandatory evacuations of as many as 100,000 homes – even near the site of a mass shooting in Thousand Oaks on Wednesday – up to the Malibu coast.

The hell also destroyed more than 100 homes, authorities said Saturday, virtually shaving a saloon and other buildings in a Hollywood set called Western Town, which served as the backdrop for the HBO television series "Westworld "and many other Western films and shows over the decades including" Dr. Quinn Medicine Women. "The film set is located in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

In Northern California, the 100,000-acre Fire Camp, which began on Thursday, continued to threaten a number of communities including the city of Oroville after killing at least 23 people and destroying over 6,400 homes and 260 businesses.

Paramount Ranch's Western Town study church remained intact after the set was almost completely destroyed by Woosley Fire in Malibu.

Paramount Ranch's Western Town study church remained intact after the set was almost completely destroyed by Woosley Fire in Malibu.

Photo:

mike nelson / epa-efe / rex / Shutterstock

Double threat

In Northern California, Camp Fire is putting thousands of structures at risk after swallowing the city of Paradise. Meanwhile, two fires in southern California have been carbonized near dense suburban areas.

Forest fires active from Friday

In Ventura County, another 4,500-acre wildfire called Hill Fire broke out on Thursday – in a less populated area – adding deep anxiety in the area after the 12-person death toll at the Borderline Bar and Grill.

"This is like a drink for the people of Thousand Oaks," said Troy Slaten, a lawyer for the Borderline owner.

The traffic interruptions caused by the burning of the hill caused a delay of Thursday between three and seven hours for the victims of the shootings and the armed man who was to be transported to the office of the medical examiner of the Ventura County in Ventura, officials said.

"What else can we do?" Said Karissa Herbert, a 17-year-old girl who used to go to the evacuation center to leave supplies and volunteer with two friends. The three said that all those who knew in the narrow and silent community had some connection with the Borderline tragedy.

By late Friday morning, the teenage center housed 250 residents seeking shelter from evacuations.

The center went quiet for a few hours Thursday night, before moving from the homes of those who sought the word that their loved ones were safe for those fleeing from the fire. One of those evacuated was Rob McCoy, pro mayor of Thousand Oaks and a pastor who had consoled families in the teenage center after filming.

Smoke from Woolsey fire in Malibu.

Smoke from Woolsey fire in Malibu.

Photo:

Grant Denham and Cassie Denham

"We had to evacuate last night after a 24-hour day, because of the shootings," said McCoy. "But my family is fine, we got everything with a heartbeat out of the house."

Steven and Kathy Smith, who live next to the Thousand Oaks-covered hills, spent much of Thursday making sure that their college-age son's friends were considered after the shooting. After discovering that no one had gone to the bar, Mr. Smith said he had dozed off.

"When I woke up, there was this particular orange cast that was an integral part of a fire," said Smith, a 59-year-old aerospace consultant and engineer. "I thought," Of all the things that have to happen now, a fire. "

Governor Gavin Newsom, in the absence of Governor Jerry Brown, who was out of the state, issued an urgent proclamation Friday for the Los Angeles and Ventura counties in relation to the fires of Hill and Woolsey, after issuing a Thursday in Butte County to witness the camp fire.

President Trump approved Newsom's request for an emergency statement in California, while he fired a tweet against the state again for what he called his management of the poor forest he blamed for the recent outbreak of fires. Among the indignation of many Californians, including firefighters, the president sent another tweet on Saturday, mitigating his remarks and offering solidarity and support to the victims and first responders.

Fires have broken out when California typically enters the rainy season, but this year the state has been blocked by a high-pressure system that has blocked Pacific storms. Meanwhile, fire officials say the state is still recovering from an extreme five-year drought that has left millions of trees weakened and dead.

Mark Ghilarducci, director of the California Governor's Emergency Services Office, said Friday that the winds that are burning will resume last Sunday after a brief respite.

The blaze known as the camp fire burned Thursday through the city of northern California's paradise.

The blaze known as the camp fire burned Thursday through the city of northern California's paradise.

Photo:

Neal Waters / Zuma Press

Write to Sara Randazzo at sara.randazzo@wsj.com and Jim Carlton at jim.carlton@wsj.com

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