Cancer causes more death than cardiovascular disease in rich countries

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health Epidemiology

Cancer is a more common cause of death than cardiovascular disease

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Pancreatic cancer cells. Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of pancreatic cancer cells. The cells are joined by a cytoplasmic bridge. The irregular shape of the cells, the cellular projections and the nodules are typical of cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer often causes no symptoms until it is well established and untreatable. Getty ImagesGetty Images Pancreatic cancer cells. Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of pancreatic cancer cells. The cells are joined by a cytoplasmic bridge. The irregular shape of the cells, the cellular projections and the nodules are typical of cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer often causes no symptoms until it is well established and untreatable. Getty ImagesGetty Images

Oncoses such as pancreatic cancer continue to top the list of most common causes of death

Source: Getty Images

Cancer is now the leading cause of death from cardiovascular disease among 35- to 70-year-olds in some countries. Many of them would even be avoidable – sometimes with more, sometimes with less personal commitment.

BIn the meantime, cancer has replaced cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death among the 35- to 70-year-olds of some rich and developing countries. This study result was presented at the European Cardiology Congress (ESC) in Paris.

According to the data published in the journal “Lancet”, the world is experiencing a decisive change in noncommunicable diseases: as cardiovascular diseases continue to decline in many countries, cancer is likely to become the leading cause of death worldwide in a few decades. National health strategies apply adapt to it.

Cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in rich countries for about half a century, researchers say. Overall, cardiovascular disease continued to be the main cause of death, even after the new analysis: 40 percent of the deaths recorded had a cardiovascular background. On average, among those aged 35 to 70 in wealthy countries, there are about twice as many deaths from cancer as from cardiovascular diseases.

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18.10.2009, Munich, Bavaria, Germany Getty ImagesGetty Images

Demography & satisfaction

For example, Canada or Sweden are considered rich countries in the so-called “PURE” study. Germany or Austria were not included in the analysis. For example, middle-income countries are China, Poland and Turkey, while poor countries are India and Tanzania.

In Germany, cancer is currently the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease. 90 percent of the approximately 230,000 cancer deaths per year are not due to the tumor itself, but to metastases – which are often difficult to combat. About 500,000 new cancers are registered every year in Germany.

The risk of disease increases in many cancers with increasing age. This will increase the number of cases in the aging society of Germany. Experts predict an increase of up to 600,000 new cases per year by 2030.

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T lymphocytes and cancer cell. Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of T lymphocyte cells (smaller round cells) attached to a cancer cell. T lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell and one of the components of the bodys immune system. They recognize a specific site (antigen) on the surface of cancer cells or pathogens and bind to it. Some T lymphocytes then signal for other immune system cells to eliminate the cell. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes eliminate the cell by releasing a protein that forms pores in the cells membrane. The genetic changes that cause a cancerous lead to the presentation of tumor antigens on the cells surface. Magnification: x1000 at 10 centimeters wide. Getty ImagesGetty Images

For those in Paris featured studies Data from around 160,000 people aged 35 to 70 from 21 countries had been analyzed. Accordingly, deaths associated with cardiovascular disease in this age group are about two and a half times more common in poorer countries than in wealthy countries – although significantly more risk factors for such diseases exist in wealthy industrialized countries.

The reason is probably the poorer health care in poor countries, explain the researchers to Salim Yusuf from McMaster University in Hamilton and Gilles Dagenais from the University of Laval in Quebec (Canada). Globally, preventable factors such as obesity, physical inactivity and high blood pressure play a major role in the development of cardiovascular disease, and in poorer countries problems such as household air pollution and malnutrition.

Even if the database is large, care should be taken when interpreting the data, the researchers explain. The results could not be generalized for all countries of the world, among other things because “PURE” Western and North Africa and Australia were not taken into account.

(t) Cardiology (t) Dying (t) Cardiology (t) Causes of death (t) Canada (t) North Africa (t) McMaster University (t) Paris (t) Health (t) Cancer (t) Tumor Disease (t) Australia (t) PURE West (t) University of Laval (t) Major cause of death

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