Children who are fed with the formula in their first four months are twice as likely to become obese as a child

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Children who are fed with the formula in their first four months are twice as likely to become obese as a child, according to new research

  • Children who are fed with the formula in the first four months are twice as likely to be obese
  • New research shows that 82% of mothers give milk to children too early
  • The World Health Organization recommends only breastfeeding for the first six months
  • Exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months also reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes

Mark Brook for Daily Mail Australia

Research shows that formula-fed and solid children in the first four months are twice as likely to become obese as a child.

Research from New Western Sydney University (WSU) revealed that the first few months of life are crucial when it comes to reducing the risk of childhood obesity later.

WSU Transitional Health Institute chief researcher Haider Mannan told the Daily Telegraph that the first four months should be off limits when it comes to the formula.

Research from New Western Sydney University revealed that the first months of life are crucial when it comes to reducing the risk of childhood obesity later (image)

Research from New Western Sydney University revealed that the first months of life are crucial when it comes to reducing the risk of childhood obesity later (image)

Research from New Western Sydney University revealed that the first months of life are crucial when it comes to reducing the risk of childhood obesity later (image)

"We recommend continuous exclusive breastfeeding for four to six months and no longer than six months as it could lead to breastfeeding exclusively for mothers, for example, for nine months that is not recommended based on the latest research" , said dr. Mannan.

The dott. Mannan said that to complete the study, the team of researchers collected data on 346 newborns over a 10-year period.

He said the data show that introducing the child's formula was common in parts of south-west Sydney, which has the highest rates of childhood obesity in Australia.

The dott. Mannan said that about 82% of the mothers included in the study reported giving their children formula or solids within the first four months.

The guidelines of the World Health Organization recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of a child's life to achieve optimal growth, development and health.

"Later, they (the children) should receive nutritious and complementary foods and continue breastfeeding for up to two years or more," says the organization's website.

New research shows that introducing baby formula is common in parts of south-west Sydney, which has the highest rates of childhood obesity in Australia (image)

New research shows that introducing baby formula is common in parts of south-west Sydney, which has the highest rates of childhood obesity in Australia (image)

New research shows that introducing baby formula is common in parts of south-west Sydney, which has the highest rates of childhood obesity in Australia (image)

The Australian Department of Health states on its website that breastfed babies are less likely to suffer from type 1 diabetes and have better cognitive development.

Jessica Nash, 34, of Connells Point in southern Sydney, said she chose to breastfeed her little Marlowe for practicality and practicality.

"You know all the recommendations, but for me it was more a case of this is what works," Nash told the publication.

Mrs. Nash said she has another child to look after, breastfeeding simplifies her life, but now that Marlowe is six months old, she will start her on solid on the advice of her pediatricians.

"He's showing all signs of being ready," he said.

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