Christmas Dinner Raised to the International Space Station - NPR

Booster of the first Falcon 9 rocket that has control problems and lacks a landing area in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

John Raoux / AP


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John Raoux / AP

Booster of the first Falcon 9 rocket that has control problems and lacks a landing area in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

John Raoux / AP

Christmas would not be Christmas without the traditional dinner, even in space.

Then a shipment of smoked turkey breast, cranberry sauce, candied fruit and, of course, fruit cake was launched at the International Space Station on Wednesday with delivery scheduled for Saturday.

But as reported by the Associated Press, the launch was delayed by one day because the food for some of the stations other the residents were moldy.

The mold had grown into food for 40 mice that, along with 36,000 worms, were sent to the space station for studies on aging and muscle.

The current crew of the International Space Station includes two Americans, two Russians, one German and one Canadian. Three crew members arrived at the start of this week and will remain there for the next six months. The others return home on December 20th, leaving only three for Christmas dinner, not counting rats and worms.

The 5,600 kilos of cargo were successfully launched into space on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. SpaceX engineers were less pleased with the first-stage booster that fell into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida, missing the his designated landing zone on the ground.

"Recovery ship sent" tweeted Space Chief Elon Musk.

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