Health Corona virus travel: airports could be set up to...

Corona virus travel: airports could be set up to welcome dogs for COVID-19 screenings

TRAVEL may be on hold for now as the world continues to be locked against coronavirus worldwide. However, new methods are being tested to help the industry in the future. Could dogs be the answer to fighting the spread of the virus?

Trips after the pandona virus pandemic (COVID-19) will certainly be different. Airports suggest screening and some airlines are stepping up social distance methods on board. However, it seems there could be another unexpected airport expansion that could play an important role in curbing the spread of coronavirus dogs.

Dogs are currently being trained as part of an attempt to detect corona viruses in passengers arriving at British airports.

The charity Medical Detection Dogs has already successfully trained their puppies to recognize cancer, Parkinson’s and malaria.

It is now hoped that these capabilities can be used to track down passengers who may need to be tested for the virus.

Experts working in the organization even believe that the dogs could detect coronavirus in asymptomatic travelers.

Dr. Claire Guest, CEO and co-founder of Medical Detection Dogs, said: “In principle, we are sure that dogs can recognize COVID-19. We are now investigating how we can safely catch the smell of the virus from patients and present it to dogs.

“The goal is that dogs can examine anyone, including those who are asymptomatic, and tell us if they need to be tested.

“This would be quick, effective and non-invasive and would ensure that the limited NHS test resources are only used where they are really needed.”

Medical Detection Dogs works with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and Durham University. A team that has recently successfully demonstrated that dogs can smell our malaria.

Professor James Logan, director of disease control at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and director of ARCTEC, said: “Our previous work has shown that dogs can detect smells from people with a malaria infection with extremely high accuracy – above the standards of World health organization for diagnosis. “

Not only can dogs recognize the unique smell that is believed to emit certain diseases, they can also detect subtle changes in skin temperature that can help when looking for fever.

Professor Logan added: “We know that other respiratory diseases like COVID-19 change our body odor, so there is a very high chance that dogs can recognize it.

“This new diagnostic tool could revolutionize our response to COVID-19 in the short term, but especially in the coming months, and have a profound impact.”

Although Britain and many other countries around the world are currently banned to fight the virus, these clever dogs could be the next step in helping the travel industry get back on its feet.

Professor Steve Lindsay of Durham University said: “If the research is successful, we could use COVID-19 detection dogs at airports at the end of the epidemic to quickly identify people who carry the virus.

“This would help prevent the disease from coming back after we have brought the current epidemic under control.”

Other measures to combat the virus while traveling at the same time could be the introduction of a new seating system on board flights.

An Italian company that designs and manufactures passenger seats for aircraft has unveiled a fascinating concept for aircraft seats to “ensure maximum insulation”.

The Aviointeriors SpA designers have introduced special seats with glass fastenings to protect passengers.

Glassafe is “a kit-level solution that can be installed on existing seats to make proximity between passengers sharing the same seat safer,” said Aviointeriors SpA.

“‘Glassafe’ is made of transparent material to make the entire cabin harmonious and aesthetically light, but perfectly fulfills the goal of creating an insulated volume around the passenger in order to avoid or to prevent air contact and interaction between passenger and passenger minimize to reduce the likelihood of contamination by viruses or others. “

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