Frontier Patrol: Multiple families of migrants are illegally passing through San Diego - AOL

TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) – The woman has crawled underneath first, squeezing her face down through a crack dug under the boundary fence. The space is only a few inches high and his feet raised dust in the air as he wriggled. Then there was her 3 year old daughter, dressed in a pink sweatshirt suit, pushed to the side of California on her back and feet first from a man who stayed in Mexico.

The mother pushed them anxiously. "Hurry up," she said. "I'm here, it does not matter if you get dirty."

Fifteen seconds later, Honduras' mother and daughter were together in the United States, and soon a US border guard agent approached an off-road vehicle to take them away in custody.

Customs and US border protection said Tuesday that the San Diego sector suffered a "slight increase" in families entering the United States illegally and have turned to agents since the caravan of Central American migrants arrived in Tijuana two weeks ago.

Thousands of migrants on the Mexican border live in crowded tent cities in Tijuana after a grueling one-week trip through Mexico on foot and hitchhiking with the goal of applying for asylum in the United States. Frustrated with the long wait to apply, with the United States processing 100 requests at most every day, some migrants are trying to cross illegally.

Rachel Rivera, 19, told the Associated Press that Honduras had become unlivable. A few moments before flattening under the fence, he said he was slipping into the United States in an attempt to "give a better life" to his daughter Charlot.

An AP video journalist also saw over two dozen migrants climbing a fence between Mexico and the United States on Monday evening. Once they passed through, whole families raised their hands before border patrolmen quickly arrived in white trucks.

It is not clear where the families were taken from there.

On a typical day before the caravan arrived in Tijuana, US border patrols in the San Diego area held about 120 people attempting to illegally cross the border from Mexico.

18 PHOTOS

One day in the life of the migrant caravan in Mexico

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Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, rests on the road, while going to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, 25 October 2018. Photo taken 25 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, is on the road with her son Adonai, as they head towards Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25th, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino / File photos SEARCH "GLENDA ESCOBAR" FOR THIS HISTORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, plays with her son Adonai in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, 28 October 2018 Photo taken on October 28th 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, sleeps in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Photo taken on 28 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, poses for a photograph with her sons Adonai and Denzel in San Pedro Tapanatepec , Mexico, 28 October 2018. 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, smiles as she rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Photo taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, poses with her son Denzel, 8, while they rest in San Pedro Tapanatepec , Mexico, 28 October 2018. Photo taken 28 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Photo taken on 28 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, is on the road with her son Denzel while walking towards Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, in Mexico, October 25, 2018. taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, prepares the place to sleep after arriving in a makeshift camp with his sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Photo taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Denzel, age 8, holds brother Adonai, 5, near his mother Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America on their way to the United States, as they go in Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25th, 2018. Photo taken October 25th 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, prepares the place to sleep after arriving in a makeshift camp with his sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Photo taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, cries after speaking on the phone in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, 28 October 2018. Photo taken on October 28th 2018 REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, is on the road, on the road to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Photo taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, poses for a photograph while resting in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, 28 October 2018. Photo taken on October 28th 2018 REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, goes for a drive in a vintage car with his sons Adonai and Denzel, as they go to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Photo taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Adonai, 5, son of Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, smiles while resting in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, 28 October 2018. Photo of 28 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of people from Central America traveling to the United States, prepares the place to sleep after arriving in a makeshift camp with his sons Adonai and Denzel, in Pijijiapan, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Photo taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino




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President Donald Trump issued a proclamation in November suspending asylum rights for people seeking to enter the United States illegally. Rights groups question the legality of this proclamation.

US Custom and Border Protection spokesman Ralph DeSio said the United States is trying to deter illegal crossings by issuing the proclamation.

The United States has established a process for asylum seekers who present themselves in an "orderly" manner at a port of entry, DeSio said via AP via email. "When people choose to ignore this process, they put themselves in danger and, in the case of families, they choose to put their children's lives at risk".

Trump returned to Twitter on Tuesday to increase support for a better border wall, claiming that spending would be less than that of the US each year due to illegal immigration.

People mainly from Honduras, but also from El Salvador and Guatemala, formed the caravan for Tijuana, looking for security in numbers as they crossed Mexico to avoid the criminals and taxes required by the gangs that preyed on the migrants. Dozens of migrants told AP they are fleeing poverty and looking for a better life, while many also speak of violence and death threats at home.

Margarita Lopez, a migrant from Honduras, said she would surely overtake the US barrier if she had the chance. But in the meantime, Lopez was lining up on Tuesday to request a humanitarian visa from Mexican officials that would allow her to live and work in Mexico for a year.

Standing close, Luis Fernando Vazquez, a migrant from Guatemala, said he would not head to the border.

"I'm not like that," he said. "I prefer to work, behave well, here."

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The Associated Press authors Amy Guthrie in Mexico City and Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed to this report.

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