Hundreds of newly built homes in Britain are at risk of crumbling


Hundreds of new homes are in danger of crumbling after they were built with the cement sub-standard, an investigation has found. There are property reports with weak mortar that does not meet the recommended industry standards on at least 13 properties in the UK. Some homeowners have been asked to sign orders of gagging to request compensation, making it difficult to assess the extent of the problem, the Victoria The Derbyshire show on BBC2 has reported. Scroll down for the video

Hundreds of new homes are in danger of crumbling after they were built with the cement sub-standard, an investigation has found. There are reports of property with weak mortar that does not meet the recommended industry standards on at least 13 properties in the UK. The industry claims that the performance of mortars can be influenced by a number of factors, including an inadequate sand / cement ratio. One of those houses was owned by Vincent Fascione, 70 years old. He said he was watching TV in 2016 when he heard a loud cracking noise from the outside walls of his home. The next morning, he found a sand-like substance on his entire front path and driveway. Photographs and videos of the era seem to show growing cracks in the mortar that holds the bricks together. Mr. Fascione, from Coatbridge, near Glasgow, purchased his two-family property in 2012 for £ 112,500. He complained to the home builder, Taylor Wimpey, and to the NHBC, the industry that provides guarantees for newly built homes.

One of those houses was owned by Vincent Fascione (pictured), 70. He said he was watching football on TV one evening in 2016 when he heard a loud cracking noise from the outside walls of his home. The next day he found a sand-like substance along its path and on the driveway under the NHBC guidelines, the mortar in most areas of the UK should consist of a 5-part cement, 5 parts of sand. In severe weather areas like Coatbridge, there should be even more cement in the mix to make it stronger and more durable. Laboratory tests on samples taken from parts of Mr Fascione's house showed that the amount of sand was almost three times higher than the recommended amount.

Some homeowners have been asked to sign orders of vomit to claim compensation, making it difficult to assess the extent of the problem, the Victoria Derbyshire show on BBC2 reported that Mr. Fascione said: "I will never buy a It was just disastrous for me. "The Victoria Derbyshire Program said it had heard of new real estate properties in at least 13 properties from Scotland to Sussex, built by several companies, with what appears to be a similar problem. Scottish borders, it is believed that Taylor Wimpey has agreed to replace the mortar in over 90 separate properties. The house builder says that an evaluation by the engineers found "no structural problems" with the houses. Phil Waller, a retired construction manager, said: "This is both widespread and serious, and can not be explained by industry as a few isolated cases."

In a single estate on the Scottish borders, it is believed that Taylor Wimpey has agreed to replace the mortar in over 90 separate properties. The manufacturer says that an evaluation of the engineers found "no structural problems" with the houses. Some construction experts blame a new type of factory-mixed mortar, which could pass a different resistance test in the lab, but not always be strong enough in the real world. In some cases, customers have ultimately recovered their homes from construction or from NHBC. In others, it appears that repairs and compensations have been made as part of an agreement that provides for the signing of a non-disclosure agreement. or a gagging clause. A spokesman for the NHBC said he had included a confidentiality clause in a "small number of rare circumstances" but refused to disclose the number.

Some construction experts also blame the transition to a new type of factory-mixed mortar, which could pass a different resistance test in the lab but not always be strong enough in the real world. He added: "We work with builders to help them improve the quality construction of the houses they build, but it is the builder who is ultimately responsible for the quality of the new homes they build." A Taylor Wimpey spokesperson said: "The tests of quality assurance are carried out on the mortar used on all our sites and there are very few cases in which it fails to meet the required standards. "The mortar we use in the construction of our homes complies with building codes and is sufficiently resistant to meet the structural requirements of homes and garages. "We want to reassure our customers that we are committed to providing quality homes and achieving high levels of customer satisfaction." On the rare occasions when problems arise, we strive to resolve them as soon as possible. "

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