Marines ID dead crew member in a plane crash in Japan - AOL

TOKYO (AP) – The United States has identified a combat pilot who died after his jet collided with a refueling aircraft during training off the coast of Japan, leaving five other missing Marines and one saved .

Two pilots were beating an F / A-18 hornet that collided with a Hercules KC-130 around 2am on Thursday. The other pilot was rescued and the crew of the refueling aircraft disappeared.

The Marine Corps has identified the dead crewman as Captain Jahmar Resilard, 28, of Miramar, Florida. He served with Marine All Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, stationed on the Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni in Yamaguchi, Japan.

"The bats are deeply saddened by the loss of Captain Jahmar Resilard, an effective and devoted leader who took care of his marines and his hunting buddies with passion," Lieutenant Colonel James Compton, commander of the squadron, said in an interview . declaration.

"His warm and charismatic nature has united us and we will miss him terribly", he added.

37 PHOTOS

The Marines throughout history

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The Marine Corps band called "The Presidents Own" was created in 1798. Here they are in 1893.

Photo credit: US Marine Corps

The marines pose for a photo in Egypt in 1907.

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The marines pose with a German trench mortar in 1918.

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Marines duing WWI circa 1918.

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The marines perform an exercise during combat training in Germany, in 1918.

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Grumman FF-2, around 1930

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Survivor of the Pearl Harbor Sergeant Technical Anglin December 8, 1941.

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The marines wait patiently to be called for "chow time" 1943.

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The marines admire a picture of a pin-up girl in 1943 while they were in Japan.

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James Wrobel, designer of VMF-312 Insignia, circa 1943

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The marines arrive on the Japanese island of Saipan. 1944 World War II

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Marines stationed in Bougainville.

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The marines await the distribution of letters from home.

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Pictured here: & # 39; Code Talkers & # 39; 1943 was a group of native American Marines who used their native language to transmit coded messages.

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The marines shoot a 155mm Howitzer Iwo Jima.

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A Marine Corpsman administers blood to a marine. 1944

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The marines are surrounded by bullets at the base of Mount Suribachi.

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The marines raise the American flag at Iwo Jima. 1945

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The Marines celebrate the end of the Second World War. 1945

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Korean War 1950.

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The female Marines began training at Parris Island, South Carolina, in 1949.

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The marines align themselves to receive objects from home. Usually soda, candies and cigarettes.

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A welcome banner can be seen here in Vietnam, welcoming the Marines of Danang in 1965.

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A marine rests while in Vietnam. 1968.

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Moment of Peace: Corporal Larry G. Nabb (Brush, Colorado) finds a moment of peace in front of a merry Christmas tree decorated in the Quang Tri base. Nabb is a truck driver with the battalion of the division of 3d Marine Division and is one of the thousands of marines celebrating their Christmas in Vietnam

Photo credit: US Marine Corps

First Class Private Ronald Duplantis prepares a 122mm enemy field weapon for shipping.

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Marines carry supplies from a cargo plane to a nearby base. 1969.

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The marines are registered to vote for the 1969 presidential elections.

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David Gurfein sits next to a Christmas tree in Saudi Arabia while serving during the Desert Shield / Storm operation.

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The US Marine Corp Assaultman Kirk Dalrymple observes a statue of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein falling in the center of Baghdad in this photo on April 9, 2003. US troops pulled down a 20-meter statue of President Saddam Hussein in the center of Baghdad and the Iraqis danced on it as a sign of contempt for the man who ruled them for 24 years. In scenes reminiscent of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Iraqis previously took a hammer in the marble plinth beneath the statue of Saddam. REUTERS / Goran Tomasevic / Files (IRAQ – Tag: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY CONFLICT) ATTENTION EDITOR – THIS PHOTO IS PART OF THE PACKAGE & # 39; 30 YEARS OF REUTERS IMAGES & # 39; TO FIND ALL THE 56 PICTURES SEARCH & # 39 ; 30 YEARS & # 39;

The marines can be seen fighting in Falluja in 2004.

Photo credit: via Wikimedia

The "Darkhorse" Marines have lost most of the men in Afghanistan compared to any other marine unit. They can be seen here in 2010.

Photo credit: US Marine Corps

Cpl. Chris Lawler observes an F / A-18C hornet with the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 122 approach during the Pitch Black 2016 exercise on August 9th, 2016.

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About 20,000 recruits are trained each year on the island of Parris.

Photo credit: US Marine Corps

Sgt. Justin Glenn Burnside motivates a recruit with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion

Photo credit: US Marine Corps

The Marines take the oath of the 2012 US Naval Academy degree program.

Photo credit: US Marine Corps




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The Marines said the two planes were involved in routine workouts, including refueling, but they were still investigating what caused the accident.

President Donald Trump tweeted that his thoughts and prayers were with members of the Marine Corps crew involved in the collision. He thanked US forces in Japan for "immediate response and relief efforts" and said, "Whatever you need, we're here for you."

The accident is the latest in the recent series of incidents involving the US military deployed near Japan.

Last month, a US F / A-18 Hornet hornet from the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier crashed into the sea south-west of the southern Japanese island of Okinawa, although its two pilots were safely rescued. In mid-October, an MH-60 Seahawk belonging to the Ronald Reagan crashed off the Philippine Sea shortly after take-off, causing non-fatal injuries to a dozen sailors.

More than 50,000 US soldiers are based in Japan in a bilateral security pact.

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