NASA identifies a huge new iceberg three times bigger than Manhattan in the Antarctic

NASA has identified a gigantic new iceberg three times bigger than Manhattan in the Antarctic.

B-46, is believed to measure 66 square miles (87 square miles), according to estimates by the US National Ice Center.

The operation of NASA IceBridge singled out the giant iceberg, which broke away from the Pine Island glacier at the end of October.

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A close view of the rift that separates the Pine Island Glacier and the B-46 Iceberg, as seen on an Operation IceBridge flight of November 7, 2018

A close view of the rift that separates the Pine Island Glacier and the B-46 Iceberg, as seen on an Operation IceBridge flight of November 7, 2018

A close view of the rift that separates the Pine Island Glacier and the B-46 Iceberg, as seen on an Operation IceBridge flight of November 7, 2018

Wednesday's flight plan brought the IceBridge team to Pine Island Glacier as part of the long campaign to gather year after year of sea ice, glaciers and critical regions of the Earth's polar ice caps.

"While the DC-8 of NASA flew its predetermined flight schedule, the new iceberg appeared at the end of October," said the space agency.

Ice racks, floating areas of glacial ice that surround much of the Antarctic, bald icebergs as part of the natural process of ice flowing to the sea.

The Pine Island Glacier in Western Antarctica is known for the distribution of icebergs in the Amundsen Sea, but the frequency of such events appears to be increasing. The Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) acquired the image to the left of the new iceberg on November 7, 2018. For comparison, the second OLI image shows the same area on September 17, 2018, before a rift it spread rapidly through the glacier and generated the icebergs.

Wednesday's flight plan brought the IceBridge team to Pine Island Glacier as part of the long campaign to gather year after year of sea ice, glaciers and critical regions of the Earth's polar ice caps.

Wednesday's flight plan brought the IceBridge team to Pine Island Glacier as part of the long campaign to gather year after year of sea ice, glaciers and critical regions of the Earth's polar ice caps.

Wednesday's flight plan brought the IceBridge team to Pine Island Glacier as part of the long campaign to gather year after year of sea ice, glaciers and critical regions of the Earth's polar ice caps.

However, the giant iceberg may not last long – NASA said "satellite images and the IceBridge flight have shown that the main iceberg is already starting to break".

Scientists are also watching closely to see if the frequency of delivery events changes over time.

The crack that was to become B-46 was first noticed at the end of September 2018 and the iceberg broke away about a month later.

But by the end of 2016, IceBridge saw a crack start through the 22-mile-wide trunk of the Pine Island Glacier.

It took a year before the rift was completely formed and the B-44 iceberg broke away in September 2017.

Pine Island has now divided large icebergs in 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018.

Before that stretch, the glacier was experiencing major birth events every six years.

The island of Pine and the nearby Thwaites glacier contribute from just 1 millimeter per decade to the global rise in sea level, as their flow of ice to the sea has accelerated in recent years, according to NASA research .

It comes a day after NASA revealed that a strange rectangular iceberg spotted in the Antarctic was "born" long before that thought.

New forms of sea ice are formed in a fracture created when the B-46 iceberg detached itself from the Pine Island glacier.

New forms of sea ice are formed in a fracture created when the B-46 iceberg detached itself from the Pine Island glacier.

New forms of sea ice are formed in a fracture created when the B-46 iceberg detached itself from the Pine Island glacier.

The rectangular iceberg was thought to have just given birth to Larsen C, who released the huge A68 iceberg in July 2017, a piece of ice the size of the state of Delaware.

"The iceberg was so clean that it was reasonable to assume it could have moved away recently from the Larsen C ice shelf," NASA said.

However, the new satellite images reveal that "it has a much more interesting story than it thought" and that it had actually floated around the sea for four months before being detected.

THE CRISIS OF THE ANTARCTIC ICE

The global sea level is increasing three times faster than a quarter of a century ago due to global warming, as a study shows.

Ice losses from Antarctica have increased sea levels by almost 8 mm (1/3 inch) since 1992, with two fifths of this growth occurring only in the last five years.

The findings indicate that people in coastal communities are at greater risk of losing their homes and becoming so-called climate refugees than previously feared.

They are the result of an important climatic evaluation known as the inter-balance comparison exercise of the ice sheet mass (Imbie).

In one of the most complete images of the Antarctic polar ice cap change to date, an international team of 84 experts combined 24 satellite surveys to achieve the results.

Professor Andrew Shepherd, of the University of Leeds, the co-leader of the study, said: "We have long suspected that changes in the Earth's climate will affect the polar ice caps.

The picture below, tweeted on November 9, 2018, by Stef Lhermitte of the Delft University of Technology, shows the little newborn icebergs. The rectangle iceberg, which at that time was about 4 kilometers long, appears to the north of a curved iceberg.

WHAT IS AN ICEBERG TABULAR?

Tabular icebergs divide the edges of ice grids in the same way that a fingernail that grows too long ends up breaking.

This is the reason why they have sharp edges.

The sharp-angled iceberg that made headlines at the end of October 2018 had a longer and rougher journey than initially thought.

The iceberg was sighted on October 16, 2018, during a flight to the IceBridge operation – the long aerial survey of NASA on polar ice.

During that day's survey of glaciers and ice floes along the northern Antarctic Peninsula, scientist Jeremy Harbeck identified the compelling berg.

Not only the edges of the icebergs were extremely straight, but the two corners looked "squared" at a right angle.

The scientists used Landsat 8 and Sentinel-1 images from the European Space Agency to trace the iceberg back to its origins.

The original "monolith" rectangular bergere was spotted near the ice shelf of Larsen C, and NASA experts believe that sharp edges are evidence that it may have recently broken off the shelf

The original "monolith" rectangular bergere was spotted near the ice shelf of Larsen C, and NASA experts believe that sharp edges are evidence that it may have recently broken off the shelf

The original "monolith" rectangular bergere was spotted near the ice shelf of Larsen C, and NASA experts believe that sharp edges are evidence that it may have recently broken off the shelf

They found that it actually went from the new front of the icebox at the beginning of November 2017, a few months after the break of A-68.

The Berg rectangle then began a journey to the north, navigating in the newly opened waters between the ice shelf of Larsen C and the Iceberg A-68.

Collision threats were everywhere: A-68 could break into small icebergs at any time, and the smaller icebergs could collide with each other.

THE INCREDIBLE TRIP OF THE BERG RECTANGULAR

He freed himself from the new front of the icebox at the beginning of November 2017, a few months after the break of A-68.

The Berg rectangle then began a journey to the north, navigating in the newly opened waters between the ice shelf of Larsen C and the Iceberg A-68.

Collision threats were everywhere: A-68 could break into small icebergs at any time, and the smaller icebergs could collide with each other.

The iceberg traveled all the way to the north and through a narrow passage between the northern tip of the A-68 and a rocky outcrop near the ice shelf known as the Bawden Ice Rise. The glaciologist NASA / UMBC Chris Shuman compares this area to a nutcracker.

An area of ​​geometric ice debris is visible in the Landsat 8 image of October 14, 2018, two days before the IceBridge flight. A-68 has repeatedly crashed against the rise and caused splinters of ice to chip into clean geometric shapes. The rectangle of the past, the iceberg, did not come out unscathed; it broke into smaller pieces. The iceberg in Harbeck's photograph, circled in the Landsat 8 satellite image, appears closer to the shape of a trapezium. The trapezoidal iceberg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is tiny compared to the A-68 sized Delaware.

An area of ​​geometric ice debris is visible in the Landsat 8 image of October 14, 2018, two days before the IceBridge flight. A-68 has repeatedly crashed against the rise and caused splinters of ice to chip into clean geometric shapes. The rectangle of the past, the iceberg, did not come out unscathed; it broke into smaller pieces. The iceberg in Harbeck's photograph, circled in the Landsat 8 satellite image, appears closer to the shape of a trapezium. The trapezoidal iceberg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is tiny compared to the A-68 sized Delaware.

An area of ​​geometric ice debris is visible in the Landsat 8 image of October 14, 2018, two days before the IceBridge flight. A-68 has repeatedly crashed against the rise and caused splinters of ice to chip into clean geometric shapes. The rectangle of the past, the iceberg, did not come out unscathed; it broke into smaller pieces. The iceberg in Harbeck's photograph, circled in the Landsat 8 satellite image, appears closer to the shape of a trapezium. The trapezoidal iceberg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is tiny compared to the A-68 sized Delaware.

A-68 has repeatedly crashed against the rise and caused splinters of ice to chip into clean geometric shapes.

An area of ​​geometric ice debris is visible in the Landsat 8 image of October 14, 2018, two days before the IceBridge flight.

The rectangle of the past, the iceberg, did not come out unscathed; it broke into smaller pieces.

The iceberg in Harbeck's photograph, circled in the Landsat 8 satellite image, appears closer to the shape of a trapezium.

The trapezoidal iceberg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is tiny compared to the A-68 sized Delaware.

By November 2018 the iceberg had moved from the rubble area and into the open sea.

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The iceberg traveled all the way to the north and through a narrow passage between the northern tip of the A-68 and a rocky outcrop near the ice shelf known as the Bawden Ice Rise. The glaciologist NASA / UMBC Chris Shuman compares this area to a nutcracker.

A-68 has repeatedly crashed against the rise and caused splinters of ice to chip into clean geometric shapes.

An area of ​​geometric ice debris is visible in the Landsat 8 image of October 14, 2018, two days before the IceBridge flight.

The rectangle of the past, the iceberg, did not come out unscathed; it broke into smaller pieces.

The iceberg in Harbeck's photograph, circled in the Landsat 8 satellite image, appears closer to the shape of a trapezium.

The trapezoidal iceberg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is tiny compared to the A-68 sized Delaware.

By November 2018 the iceberg had moved from the rubble area and into the open sea.

Shuman said: "Now it's just another iceberg about to die".

A second The rectangular iceberg, known as a "tabular" iceberg, was located off the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, near the ice shelf of Larsen C and near the first.

It's part of a big "camp of berg" NASA experts may have recently broken off the shelf and say that sharp corners and flat surfaces are evidence that the break has occurred very recently.

Just past the original rectangular iceberg, which is visible from behind the outboard motor, IceBridge has seen another relatively rectangular ice and the A68 iceberg in the distance.

Just past the original rectangular iceberg, which is visible from behind the outboard motor, IceBridge has seen another relatively rectangular ice and the A68 iceberg in the distance.

Just past the original rectangular iceberg, which is visible from behind the outboard motor, IceBridge has seen another relatively rectangular ice and the A68 iceberg in the distance.

The picture was taken during an IceBridge flight on a planetary polar ice survey of the planet that provides a 3D view of the ice that constitutes the Arctic and the Antarctic, providing vital information on how it changes over time .

"I thought it was pretty interesting; I often see icebergs with relatively straight edges, but I've never actually seen one with two corners at such angles as this, "said Jeremy Harbeck, senior support scientist at IceBridge.

The rectangular iceberg seemed to have just given birth to Larsen C, who released the huge A68 iceberg in July 2017, a piece of ice the size of the state of Delaware.

In a different photo (above), Harbeck has captured both the edge of the now famous iceberg and a slightly less rectangular iceberg. That image also captures A68 in the distance.

"Actually, I was more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were flying over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and quite photogenic, so I only had a couple of pictures on a lark," he said Harbeck.

The flight started in Punta Arenas, Chile, as part of a five-week IceBridge deployment, which began October 10 and is due to end on November 18th.

The scheme is NASA's longest airborne survey on polar ice.

During the survey, designed to assess the changes in the ice height of different glaciers that flow into the fires of Larsen A, B and C, the IceBridge support scientist, Jeremy Harbeck, has identified a very pointed tabular iceberg that floats in the ice, off Larsen C, a glacier.

The strange, angular berg is known as a tabular iceberg.

The flight saw a "field" of large tabular icebergs positioned between the Larsen C ice shelf of Antarctica and the ice island A-68, which left Larsen C last year. as seen on a NASA Operation IceBridge mission

The flight saw a "field" of large tabular icebergs positioned between the Larsen C ice shelf of Antarctica and the ice island A-68, which left Larsen C last year. as seen on a NASA Operation IceBridge mission

The flight saw a "field" of large tabular icebergs positioned between the Larsen C ice shelf of Antarctica and the ice island A-68, which left Larsen C last year. as seen on a NASA Operation IceBridge mission

This panorama of the entire first tabular iceberg was modified together by two images taken while flying over the icebergs

This panorama of the entire first tabular iceberg was modified together by two images taken while flying over the icebergs

This panorama of the entire first tabular iceberg was modified together by two images taken while flying over the icebergs

"A tabular iceberg can be seen on the right, floating in the ice just off the Larsen C ice shelf," the space agency said.

"The sharp corners and the flat surface of the iceberg indicate that it has probably moved away recently from the ice shelf."

In an interview with LiveScience, NASA scientist Kelly Brunt said that "tabular icebergs are like fingernails that break, giving them sharp edges.

What makes this a little bit unusual is that it almost seems like a square, "he said.

He estimated that its size is about a mile wide.

Scientists have been following Larsen C closely since a huge iceberg broke free and started spinning.

The experts had previously stated that the giant area, estimated to be the size of Delaware, was closed in its place, telling it & # 39;it probably stuck on the bottom of the sea & # 39;

"But now A68 has started to swing north," recently said the polar oceanographer Mark Brandon, who identified the movement using the temperature data collected by the Suomi NPP satellite.

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