Possible Ebola patient released by the Nebraska hospital

Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever, has killed at least 11,000 worldwide after decimating West Africa and spread rapidly within two years.

That epidemic was officially declared in January 2016, when Liberia was announced to be without Ebola from the WHO.

The country, shaken by consecutive civil wars that ended in 2003, was hit harder by fever, with 40 percent of the deaths there.

Sierra Leone reported the highest number of Ebola cases, with almost all those infected who were residents of the nation.

WHERE HAVE YOU STARTED?

An analysis, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the epidemic began in Guinea, bordering Liberia and Sierra Leone.

A team of international researchers was able to trace the epidemic to a two-year-old child in Meliandou – about 400 miles (650 km) from the capital, Conakry.

Emile Ouamouno, more commonly known as Patient Zero, may have contracted the deadly virus by playing bats in a hollow tree, according to a suggested study.

HOW MANY PEOPLE WERE STRUCCATED?

WHICH COUNTRIES HAVE BEEN SUPPORTED BY EBOLA DURING THE EPIDEMIA 2014-16? (Figures CDC)
NATION CASES DEAD MORTALITY RATE (%)
GUINEA 3,814 2,544 66.7%
SIERRA LEONE 14,124 3,956 28.0%
LIBERIA 10,678 4,810 45.0%
NIGERIA 20 8 40.0%
SENEGAL 1 0 N / A
SPAIN 1 0 N / A
WE 4 1 25.0%
MALI 8 6 75.0%
UK 1 0 N / A
ITALY 1 0 N / A

Figures show that around 29,000 people have been infected with ebola, which means that the virus has killed about 40% of those affected.

Cases and deaths have also been reported in Nigeria, Mali and the United States – but on a much smaller scale, with 15 deaths among the three nations.

Health officials in Guinea reported a mysterious insect in the southeastern regions of the country before the WHO confirmed that it was Ebola.

Ebola was first identified by scientists in 1976, but the most recent epidemic reduced the number of others recorded in history, as shown in the figures.

HOW DO THE HUMANS WORK THE VIRUS?

Scientists believe that Ebola is most often passed on to humans by fruit bats, but also antelopes, porcupines, gorillas and chimpanzees could be the cause.

It can be transmitted among humans through the blood, secretions and other bodily fluids of people – and surfaces – that have been infected.

C & # 39; IS A TREATMENT?

WHO warns that there is no "proven treatment" for Ebola, but dozens of drugs and blows are tested in the event of an equally devastating epidemic.

Hope exists, however, after an experimental vaccine, called rVSV-ZEBOV, protected by nearly 6,000 people. The results were published in The Lancet.

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