“Revolution”: the healing power of dance

The only boy in the middle of his group of girls, Tommy Durand had already been noticed by the Masters during the first season. Sunday night he came back solo to Revolution, even stronger and in complete control of his movements.

Go solo in a competition like Revolution represents a big challenge for Tommy Durand. “I’ve only been doing solos for three or four years, because I’m often too stressed out to perform on stage on my own.”

The 19-year-old had a difficult childhood, especially because his father, a professional soldier, regularly left for long missions abroad. His son often wondered if he had abandoned him and if he was going to come back. “I was always with my mother who took care of me. Through this first issue, I wanted to show that no matter what happens in life, we must always follow the little light that we have in ourselves and which helps us through the most difficult times. My father came back safe and sound from the war. ”

After living full time with his mother during his youth, Tommy now lives with his father. “We make up for lost time, it allows us to develop our relationship to the maximum. In my life, I could have had quality time with both of my parents, even though they are no longer together. ”

A model

Tommy’s childhood was also filled with intimidation from other young people around him, especially because he was doing ballet and contemporary. “Everything I have been through has been difficult and has affected my morale, but all the obstacles I have faced have allowed me to grow my passion for dance. This is what allows me today to experience all that I live, and to be who I am. I gave myself 100 000% to achieve my dreams, without listening to those who tried to put me down. ”

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After his appearance on the show in 2018, he seems to have inspired many young boys to enroll in ballet, jazz or contemporary classes. “There has been a dramatic increase in enrollment of young boys in my dance studio. Parents also came to see me telling me that their son had a click when he saw me on TV. It’s like mission accomplished for me. ”

Vincent and Bianca, 28 and 34 years old, Saint-Constant


Vincent and Bianca

PHOTO COURTESY / OSA IMAGES

Vincent and Bianca

After trying their luck in the first season, Vincent and Bianca had not necessarily planned to return, but the cancellation of various competitions due to the Covid made them change their minds. “We never stopped training during the pandemic,” said Vincent. It had been several months since we had danced in public, and it was a way of showing our progress. ” Since their first participation, the couple have become professional, and they want to dust off the habits of the community a little. “We would like to make our dance more accessible,” explained Bianca. The ballroom is often represented by large dresses, sequins, the usual clichés. Our goal is to show that no matter who wants to dance, it is possible to do so without necessarily investing a lot of money for dresses. But the environment remains very formal. ” The originality of their number lay in the moments of slow motion that they inserted in their Chacha. “We wanted to do a variation in the tempo, it allowed us to show better control of our steps.”

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Emmanuelle Martin, 32, Montreal


Emmanuelle Martin

PHOTO COURTESY / OSA IMAGES

Emmanuelle Martin

“I wanted to participate in Revolution to put me in a zone of discomfort, a friend told me that I should not put myself in any barrier in dance. It was a new experience for me. ” What interests him mainly is expressiveness, the fact of trying to go elsewhere, to use body language, movement, which tells a story. For her first number on the show, she wanted to pay tribute to sister. “One of the reasons why I dance is that I am lucky to have my little sister, who has multiple disabilities, and who allows me to understand that I am lucky to be able to walk, to speak, to think. … When I dance, in my head, I thank and honor all the people who have not been so lucky. There is a therapeutic side to the dance. ”

Jamal and Raphaëlle, 20 and 22 years old, Montreal


Jamal and Raphaëlle

PHOTO COURTESY / OSA IMAGES

Jamal and Raphaëlle

Raphaëlle participated in the first season with her group Seem So Far, but she did not want to venture alone in this third season. So she asked Jamal, a dancer she didn’t know very well, to create a duet with her. Their performance is breathtaking because they are synchronized to perfection, as if they have always been dancing together. “We have created such a strong bond between us,” said the 20-year-old dancer. We have great chemistry and that’s what stands out. We are like yin and yang, very different, but complementary. ” Despite the pandemic, the two never stopped dancing and practicing. “We took a line dance program called Motus,” said Jamal. These are three-hour repetitions, four times a week. We felt an improvement following this program. We knew that we had to take courses of this kind to have the level of Revolution. It also allowed us to get to know each other better. ” The two dancers specify that they are not in a relationship, but their understanding is perfect.

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The candidates saved this week:

  • Vincent and Bianca, 28 and 34 years old, Saint-Constant
  • Yasmina Bourgon, 15, Quebec
  • Palomeque, 24 years old, Laval
  • T.acos, 13 to 17 years old, Granby (waiver)
  • Emmanuelle Martin, 32, Montreal
  • VYBZ, 31, Montreal (waiver)
  • Jamal and Raphaëlle, 20 and 22 years old, Montreal
  • TNV, 14 to 19 years old, Rive-Nord
  • Tommy Durand, 19, Quebec

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