The architecture and transport plans rejected by London are really fantastic

For all its faults, London is a nice place to live.

Yes, it's expensive and a pint will cost you more here than anywhere else in the country, but it's full of iconic buildings and monuments that make it a truly unique city.

But what would happen if some of these were completely different? How would London really be?

To imagine it, Barratt Homes has released a series of computer-designed images showing declined transport and architectural plans – and the result is unbelievable.

Pyramid of Trafalgar Square

He would have had 22 steps, each of which would pay tribute to each year of the two wars
A 300-foot pyramid was proposed for Trafalgar Square

Did you know that there were plans made in the early 1800s to build a 300-foot pyramid in central London to commemorate the victories of the Battle of Trafalgar and the Battle of the Nile.

He would have had 22 steps, each of which would pay tribute to each year of the two wars.

Although there was no specific position marked for the pyramid, which would have been higher than the Cathedral of St. Paul, in 1820 the earth was cleared to make way for the area we now call Trafalgar Square.

In the twenties of the nineteenth century the land was liberated for the area we now know as Trafalgar Square

Westminster airport

You might remember the plans for the Thames Estuary airport, which has had more proposals for its existence since the 1940s and, more recently, by Boris Johnson while serving as mayor of London.

But did you know that the plans had been forwarded to build an airport on the Thames, directly next to the Parliament?

In 1934, plans were made for the Westminster airport to help bring more international travel to the city center.

An airport has also been proposed for the Thames directly outside the Parliament

According to the projects, the airport would have been high enough to accommodate the "tallest ships", according to the Popular Science Monthly edition of 1934, and would have been enough to land a single propeller aircraft.

There would also be aircraft and fuel storage on a separate level below.

There would even be spaces below for airplanes and fuel

Central London Monrail

In the 60s a monorail was proposed that crossed central London, as a means of reducing road congestion and getting rid of buses.

Unfortunately, it has never been given the go-ahead, and will remain an idea for now.

Do you think how nice it would be if this were something?

Crystal Palace Skyscraper

In 1851, at the height of the British production boom, Queen Victoria hosted the Great Performance at Hyde Park to show over 100,000 revolutionary and contemporary artifacts to potential business partners around the world.

The exhibition was housed inside a gigantic glass and iron structure, which became known as the Crystal Palace.

When it was over, it was transferred to Penge Place in Sydenham (which has since been renamed Crystal Palace Park), where it remained until 1936 when it was burned.

This was a plan on what to do with the materials of The Crystal Palace

But before his move, an architect named Charles Burton launched an alternative idea to use glass and steel to build a 1,000-foot structure, the same height as The Shard.

The idea was not used, which was probably positive, as modern architects claim that the building would probably collapse under its own weight.

The idea was not used, which was probably positive, as modern architects claim that the building would probably collapse under its own weight.

The Hotel Carlton

How it seemed before it was destroyed (Image: REX / Shutterstock)

This was actually built in 1899, and it was a leap forward compared to its competitors in terms of luxury and spending right now.

Based in the central area of ​​Haymarket, the luxury hotel attracted customers away from facilities such as the Savoy.

The Carlton Hotel was the epitome of luxury until it was bombed in the 1940s

However, in 1940, it was severely damaged by German bombs and had to close the guests and was eventually demolished in 1957.

In its place now stands the High Commission of New Zealand, an overseas post of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of New Zealand.

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