The mother, 44, who "thought she had a chest infection" dies of lung cancer

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A mother who thought she had a chest infection died of lung cancer 12 years after she defeated the disease.

Julie Newman, 44, of Hull, lost her battle after the cancer spread to her bones and brain within a year.

He had spent years doing advertising campaigns on the importance of having a smear to test other women after defeating uterus neck cancer in 2007.

He initially thought he had irregular periods before the shock diagnosis after a screening he was almost a year late.

The grandmother's family, who said they had "turned everyone's world", hoped to make the Hull KR fans beat in her memory for Sunday's game for a minute.

Julie Newman, 44, lost her battle in March after what she believed to be a chest infection turned out to be a lung cancer, 12 years after beating uterus neck cancer

Julie Newman, 44, lost her battle in March after what she believed to be a chest infection turned out to be a lung cancer, 12 years after beating uterus neck cancer

Ms. Newman had spent years doing advertising campaigns on the importance of having a test smear to other women after defeating cervical cancer in 2007. Pictured at a charity event

Ms. Newman had spent years doing advertising campaigns on the importance of having a test smear to other women after defeating cervical cancer in 2007. Pictured at a charity event

Ms. Newman, mother of Charlie, 26, and Georgia, 23, was described by her family as a devoted mother, wife and grandmother.

Georgia said: "She was simply family oriented, always wanted to be with her family.

It was absolutely there, day after day, no matter what time, we were his world. He took his last breath with us there.

"He enlightened everyone's world and turned heads wherever he went. As soon as you met him, you enjoyed it. He was down on Earth and she got along with everyone.

"Wherever he went, he made friends – all over the world. Every time he could she would have been a globetrotter.

Ms Newman underwent chemotherapy, radiation therapy and internal radiation therapy for her cervical cancer.

After defeating cancer, Ms Newman became an inspiration for other women with the disease.

She trained with Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust charity and opened a hull branch in St Aidan's church on Southcoates Avenue, east of Hull.

At the time, Mrs. Newman told Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust: "Over the past 18 months I have continued to bleed consistently, but I had always reduced it to irregular periods.

Finally I booked a cervical screening test and after the results I had a call inviting me to colposcopy. A week later I was told I had cervical cancer.

"I knew nothing of the illness and if I did I would have acted before.

Similarly, if I had witnessed my cervical screening test when it was due, the cancer would have been detected earlier and may not have been as advanced. & # 39;

Ms. Newman campaigned for other women to undergo regular smear tests and worked on a voluntary basis to help raise awareness of the condition.

Ms Newman was a devoted mother and grandmother who "illuminated everyone's world"

Ms Newman was a devoted mother and grandmother who "illuminated everyone's world"

Mrs. Newman, in the photo with the family, was shocked to learn that she had cancer again in February 2018 after being clear for so long. She died in March, surrounded by a family

Mrs. Newman, in the photo with the family, was shocked to learn that she had cancer again in February 2018 after being clear for so long. She died in March, surrounded by a family

Georgia said: "Helping others was a great thing for my mother.

It was dedicated to helping others. He did it voluntarily because that's what he wanted to do.

& # 39; We did charity walks and you did many interviews with magazines and newspapers. & # 39;

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF LUNG CANCER?

Lung cancer symptoms develop as the condition progresses and there are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages.

The main symptoms of lung cancer include:

  • a cough that does not disappear after two or three weeks
  • a long-standing cough that gets even worse
  • chest infections
  • Coughing up blood a pain or pain during breathing or coughing
  • persistent dyspnea
  • persistent fatigue or lack of energy
  • loss of appetite or unexplained weight loss

If you have any of these, you should see your doctor.

Less common symptoms of lung cancer include:

  • changes in the appearance of the fingers, such as becoming more curved or their extremities becoming larger (this is known as clubbing finger)
  • a high temperature (fever) of 38 ° C (100.4 ° F) or higher
  • difficulty swallowing or pain when swallowing
  • dyspnoea
  • a hoarse voice that swells from your face or your neck
  • persistent chest or shoulder pain

After being cancer free for so long, she was shocked and devastated to learn that she had cancer again in February 2018 after she fell ill in October 2017.

She had an attack last August and was only granted eight weeks of life. But he fought the disease for another seven months until his death, this March 6th of this year.

She died at home, surrounded by her family.

"The mother fought until the end," Georgia, the mother of one, said. "We had a great Christmas with her, she was all mobile until a couple of weeks ago.

& # 39; Mom was very proud. She didn't want strangers to see her as she was, so we took care of her 24 hours a day like a family. Towards the end, the Macmillan team came to help.

"She was brave for us, she didn't want us to panic. But basically my mother didn't want to die, she didn't want to go. Both my mother's parents are still here.

& # 39; e & # 39; so devastating, we knew the day was coming. It was just awful. "

In more recent years, Mrs. Newman, who was Logan's 10-year-old grandmother, Connie-Leigh, six, Aston, five and Ronni-Willow, three, was a Hull KR fan.

The family has appealed for Hull KR fans to applaud the game on Sunday when the team plays The Catalans Dragons at KCOM Craven Park.

They want the fans to clap for a minute, at the 44th minute of the game.

"Mom was Rovers in all respects, it was an important part of her life," Georgia said.

"We asked the club if we could make a minute of silence at the next game, but they can only do it once a year, which we understand perfectly, the rules are rules.

& # 39; If they did it for everyone it would be silent every week. So instead, we want everyone to be applauded for the 44th minute at the next home game this Sunday.

"We have made some banners and we will all take a flag. It was dedicated to Rovers, so this is one thing – the least it deserves."

WHAT IS A SMEAR TEST?

A smear test detects abnormal cells on the cervix, which is the entrance to the uterus from the vagina.

Removal of these cells can prevent cervical cancer.

Most of the test results are clear, however, one in 20 women shows abnormal alterations in the neck cells of the uterus.

In some cases, these must be removed or they can become carcinogenic.

Being screened regularly means that any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, treated to stop the development of cancer (stock)

Being screened regularly means that any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, treated to stop the development of cancer (stock)

Cervical cancer most commonly affects sexually active women between 30 and 45 years.

In the United Kingdom, the NHS cervical screening program invites women aged between 25 and 49 to smear every three years, those aged between 50 and 60 every five years and women over the age of 65 if they have not been screened since 50 years or if they previously had abnormal results.

Women must be registered with a GP to be invited to a test.

In the United States, tests begin when women are 21 and run every three years to reach age 65.

Changes in cervical cells are often caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV), which can be transmitted during sexual intercourse.

In January 2018, women shared selfies with lipstick smeared on social media to raise awareness of the importance of undergoing the uterus neck cancer test in a campaign initiated by Jo & # 39; s Cervical Cancer Trust.

Celebrities including model and socialite Tamara Ecclestone, former I & # 39; m A Celebrity! star Rebekah Vardy and the former actress from Emmerdale, Gaynor Faye, joined together to support the #SmearForSmear campaign.

The socialite Tamara Ecclestone supports the #SmearForSmear campaign of Jo & # 39; s Trust

The socialite Tamara Ecclestone supported the #SmearForSmear campaign of Jo & # 39; s Trust

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