The technology brings alive the images of the survivors of the Holocaust – it.live-feeds.com

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The memories of Holocaust survivors are now preserved so that people of future generations can interact with them. The survival stories of the victims of the Nazi regime, which killed about six million Jews during the Second World War, are transferred to holograms. The Shoah Foundation of the University of Southern California was founded in 1994 by director Steven Spielberg and has about 55,000 audiovisual testimonies. Interactive technology allows museum visitors to dialogue with survivors even after they have gone to "learn from the mistakes of the world". Scroll down for video The memories of Holocaust survivors are now preserved so that people of future generations can interact with them. Max Glauben, here during the recording, was seventeen when he lost both his parents and his brother at the hands of the Nazi regime, but was saved by American troops while he was in Poland (McGuire Boles / Dallas Holocaust Museum via AP) L & # 39; experience combines the high definition recordings of holographic interviews and speech recognition technology to enable Holocaust survivors to tell their deeply moving personal stories and answer questions from the public. Max Glauben is the last survivor of the Holocaust thus registered by the University. Mr. Glauben, now 91, was seventeen when he lost both his parents and his brother at the hands of the Nazi regime, but was rescued by American troops in 1945. "I thought that my knowledge could cure hate and bigotry. and the killings in this world if someone can hear my story, my testimony and be educated even after I leave, "said Glauben. The Los Angeles Foundation recorded 18 interactive testimonies with Holocaust survivors in recent years. In this October 2017 photo, Holocaust survivor Fritzie Fritzshall is faced with a hologram of herself at The Abe & Ida Cooper Survivor Stories Experience in the Museum of Illocaust and Illinois 39; Illinois to Skokie, Ill. (Ron Gould / Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center via AP) Executive director Stephen Smith says he is in a "race against time" as they work to add more, looking for both a diversity of experiences and testimonies in a variety of languages. So far, the foundation has survived the Holocaust by speaking in English, Hebrew, and Spanish, and the group hopes to have people speak in multiple languages. Executive Director Stephen Smith says he is in a "race against time" as they work to add more, looking for diversity in experiences and testimonies in a variety of languages. "It's so powerful when it's in your mother tongue and you're looking at the person in the eye and you're listening to the soft language that's back in your language," Smith said. The experience combines recordings of high-definition holographic interviews and speech recognition technology to enable Holocaust survivors to tell their deeply moving personal stories and answer questions from the public. Here a student asks a question to the survivor of the Holocaust William Morgan For more than a year, the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center featured images of the survivors in a special theater. The museum's CEO Susan Abrams states that when visitors interact with images, the impact is often obvious: "People complain, people laugh." Our audience comes to hear that they know these survivors somehow intimately because they are having a group conversation, "said Abrams.The Illinois Museum is one of the four currently with pictures.Other museums are in Houston, Indiana and New York: This August 2018 photo shows Max Glauben, survivor of the Holocaust, sitting in an interactive green room while filming his piece The foundation claims to be in a "race against time" while They work to add a variety of different experiences and testimonies.The Dallas Holocaust Museum will begin showing the testimonies in September, after it opens in a new location and with a new name – the Holocaust museum and of human rights in Dallas The Dallas Museum currently brings survivors to talk with students and has discovered that it is often the most significant part of their visit, according to President and CEO Mary Pat Higgi Our technology ensures it can continue, he said. "Our survivors are getting old, and so in 20 years we will not have survivors who are still able to do it alone," he said. Smith said that images can appear on a screen plane or be projected in a way that appears to be three-dimensional. The Dallas museum currently brings survivors to talk with students and has discovered that it is often the most significant part of their visit. The foundations say that this new technology will ensure that it continues to happen. In the photo here, the hologram of William MorganLike Illinois, Dallas is building a special theater so that the image appears three-dimensional on a stage. Smith said the technology involved is simpler than most people think. "And all that's happening is rather than looking at a testimony, all the fragments of the testimony are broken, and then when you ask him a question he finds that piece of video and plays it for you." Matthew Rosca-Halmagean, 17, right , a student at the Westchester Academy for International Studies, asks a question to the survivor of the Holocaust William Morgan a question at the hologram of William MorganJT Buzanga, assistant curator of the Holocaust Museum in Houston, said that the uniqueness of interactive testimonials gives visitors a reason to come back. "It's something that makes the connection that people want to remember and I want to come back," said Buzanga. Glauben, who has made his mission to tell people about the Holocaust, has helped found the Dallas museum. He says that after losing his family, he said he would "do everything possible to educate people and let them know what kind of tragedy it was". The images can appear on a flat screen or be projected in a way that appears to be three-dimensional In the picture here, visitors look at the survivor of the Holocaust Fritzie Fritzshall at The Abe & Ida Cooper Survivor Stories Experience in the Holocaust Museum of Illinois Amy Frake, center, explains to the students of the Westchester Academy for International Studies how to ask a question to his hologram. The testimony is divided, so when you ask a question, find that piece of video and play it for you. WHAT WAS THE AUSCHWITZ CONCENTRATION FIELD? Auschwitz was a concentration and extermination camp used by the Nazis during the Second World War. The camp, located in Poland, consisted of three main sites. Auschwitz I, the original concentration camp, Auschwitz II-Birkenau, a combined concentration / extermination camp and Auschwitz III-Monowitz, a field of work, with 45 other satellite sites. Bokkenau became an important part of the Nazi "Final Solution", so they tried to free Europe from the Jews. About 1.3 million people were sent to the camp, of which at least 1.1 million died – about 90% of whom were Jews. Since 1947, it has operated as a state museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, which in 1979 was proclaimed a UNESCO world heritage site. Auschwitz was an extermination camp used by the Nazis in Poland to kill more than 1.1 million Jews. Since 1947 it has operated as a state museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, which in 1979 was named UNESCO World Heritage Site

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