Young city people have billions of air pollution particles in their hearts, new study shows

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Young people living in cities have billions of air pollution particles in their hearts, a new study has found.

In one shocking case, a three-year-old had small toxins in the cells of the organ, which had damaged its pumping muscles.

The backlog of traffic – as well as industry – in UK cities may be to blame for high rates of disease in populated area, scientists said, which could pose to serious public health problem.

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The new study saw scientists take heart tissue from 63 people - with an average age of 25 - who lived in the highly polled Mexico City (pictured)

The new study saw scientists take heart tissue from 63 people – with an average age of 25 – who lived in the highly polled Mexico City (pictured)

When there were doubts about the study, it is the first direct evidence

The iron-rich nonoparticles could even mess with the electrical signals that pump the heart.

The new study saw scientists taking heart tissue from 63 people – with an average age of 25 – who lived in the highly polled Mexico City.

The subjects had died in traffic collisions but did not have any injuries to their chests.

Researchers first looked at the quantity of iron-rich nanoparticles in the body, then where they were found and what damage they had caused to tissue.

The 63 cases drew totals of between 2billion and 22billion particles per gram of dried tissue.

The subjects of the study had to do with their chests. Pictured: A woman wearing a face mask against dangerously high levels of pollution in a city

The subjects of the study had to do with their chests. Pictured: A woman wearing a face mask against dangerously high levels of pollution in a city

There were no tests taken in other people in Mexico City, which showed them to two times less particles in their tissue.

The team said 'exposure to (nanoparticles) appears to be directly associated with early and significant cardiac damage', with Prof. Maher adding it could be the same in other cities.

Professor Barbara Maher, from Lancaster University, told the Guardian: 'It is a preliminary study in a way, but the findings and implications were too important to get the information out there.'

Profs Maher added: 'For those who are really young people, the evidence is very early stage damage both in the heart and the brain. '

Professor Barbara Maher, from Lancaster University, told the Guardian: 'It is a preliminary study in a way, but the findings and implications were too important to get information out there.' Pictured: Smoke from numerous forest fires over Mexico City's iconic Reforma Avenue and Chapultepec Castle, on May 14

Professor Barbara Maher, from Lancaster University, told the Guardian: 'It is a preliminary study in a way, but the findings and implications were too important to get information out there.' Pictured: Smoke from numerous forest fires over Mexico City's iconic Reforma Avenue and Chapultepec Castle, on May 14

It was already understood that air pollution particles from roads could damage the body.

Blood impingement on mitochondria, which affect the heart.

The findings as three years after graduation by Maher and others at the university found traces of the same nanoparticles in people's brains – which caused damage to Alzheimer's.

And another study has been found, so they have breathed in and out of the blood.

This high-level shot of Mexico City of 21million people

This high-level shot of Mexico City of 21million people

As it is unethical to experiment on people, used in these studies are epidemiological, but last year was a matter of finding oneself in the aftermath of women.

Said Mark Miller, who is an expert on the University of Edinburgh who studies the effect of air pollution on the cardiovascular system, said: walk and cycle for short journeys. '

He did not take part in the study.

It was already understood that air pollution particles from roads could damage the body. Matters in the energy-producing mitochondria, which helps the heart pump blood around the body. Pictured: A wears face mask against high levels of soot in Mexico

It was already understood that air pollution particles from roads could damage the body. Matters in the energy-producing mitochondria, which helps the heart pump blood around the body. Pictured: A wears face mask against high levels of soot in Mexico

The particles found from burning fuel, which cool to form spheres.

These were found in the heart of the brain.

With the technique used, the scientist could find the particles but could not assess their formation.

They had to split the tissue and the particles for this, using the average size and how magnetic they were to a total figure.

The team wanted to get a definitive answer for how to deal with the expensive equipment needed.

The height of fear is caused by road traffic particles.

Four million children around the world develop asthma each year because of it, a major study estimated.

Exposure to nitrogen dioxide, largely from road transport, is thought to be behind 38,000 new cases in the UK and 240,000 in the US each year.

The global research, which was reported in April, the 29th worst out of 194 countries for the rate of development of children from traffic pollution.

Global research ranked the UK the 29th worst out of 194 countries for the rate of development of children from traffic pollution. The US placed 22nd while Australia came 64th, according to the study published in a prestigious medical journal

Global research ranked the UK the 29th worst out of 194 countries for the rate of development of children from traffic pollution. The US placed 22nd while Australia came 64th, according to the study published in a prestigious medical journal

The road outside Earl's Court Underground Station in Kensington, London, is the most polluted in the country, according to Friends of the Earth's research

The road outside Earl's Court Underground Station in Kensington, London, is the most polluted in the country, according to Friends of the Earth's research

Charities have warned of the evidence that toxic fumes are putting tens of thousands of children at risk of potentially deadly attacks.

Researchers found 19 for cents of asthma cases in youngsters – aged one to 18 – in the UK and US can be attributed to nitrogen dioxide pollution.

This rose to almost a third in London (29 per cent) where pollution levels are highest, according to the study published in The Lancet Planetary Health.

In the UK, there were the equivalent of 280 new cases each yer for 100,000 children – compared to 550 in Kuwait, which ranked the worst.

Dr Samantha Walker, of Asthma UK, said:

THE WORST 10 AREAS FOR AIR POLLUTION IN THE UK

UK locations ranked by annual average of NO2 (in ug / m3) – the objective is 40ug / m3:

1. Earls Court Station, Kensington & Chelsea, London – 129.5

2. Junction North Circular Rd / Chartley Avenue, Brent, London – 115.39

3. IKEA, Hut, North Circular Road, Brent, London – 102.1

4. Neville Street (NW Tunnel entrance), Leeds – 99

5. Fir Tree Close, Hickleton, Doncaster – 96

6. Kensington H St / Kensington Church St, London – 94.5

7. Euston Road, Camden, London – 92.45

8. Strand, City of Westminster, London – ninety two

9. High Street, Harlesden, Brent, London – 91.83

10. Haddon Hall, Tower Bridge Road, Southwark, London – 90.79

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